Friday Photo

Heading back from dropping my sons off at 5 a.m. one blustery morning…

This is one of those perspective aphorisms; like, “If you’re an upside-down trampoline impaled on a stop sign, nothing worse can happen to either of you for the rest of the day.”

©2023 Chel Owens

Mommy, dear

Mommy, dear, why do you cry
at the toast
the eggs
the strawb’ry jam
(I may have spilled across your bed)?

Look, dear Mom, at this great card
I made in school
with all the cray’ns
(stuffed in my pack)
forgot, till now.

But-
Mommy, dear, I love you so!
through tears
a sniff
a strawb’ry hug;

you smile and say, “I know.”

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

©2023 Chel Owens

Movies and Cultural Literacy

Which films would you say are necessary to watch?

I propose to you an interesting dilemma: a friend who has closely guarded her offsprings’ viewing materials feels she’s done them a disservice now that they’re nearing adulthood. That is, the other teens talk a talk (and meme a meme) that she isn’t sure her teens can follow.

Cue: Family Movie Night.

Also cue: asking her friends which movies we thought were necessary.

We’re trying not to go crazy, but have started a list of ideas… and may have texted the instant a new one came to mind.

It’s a rare opportunity, really. I feel like I’ve been handed Tarzan from the jungle. It’s a Mormon Rumspringa* of viewing; nostalgia of youth; study of art; excuse to eat popcorn.

So, the question of today is an easy one: which movies do you think are a must to view in one’s life? Which do you love/hate/want your money back from? What would you add to the list?

—–

Here’s what I wrote for the past week:
Wednesday, May 3: Asked why you blog.

Thursday, May 4: Announced the Terrible Poetry Contest! We’re limerick-ing about Vermont cheddar cheese!

Friday, May 5: Friday Photo. Poor piano.

Saturday, May 6: A poem. Sort-of.

Sunday, May 7: Shared Stuart Perkin’s quote from his interview.

Monday, May 8: Atheist to Theist. I’ll probably re-work this one.

Tuesday, May 9: Responded to Carrot Ranch’s prompt.

Wednesday, May 10: This post.

©2023 Chel Owens

*I’d like to note that Rumspringa isn’t a wild glut of abandonment as is popularly-depicted, but worked as an analogy even at its tamest definition for use in this blog post.

Frenemies

“I left my wife for a younger woman.” How dare that fat, ugly, stupid, self-centered husband of Barb’s consider that cliché phrase; how dare a younger woman consider him??

Maybe it was sour grapes, like Barb’s mother hinted.

Maybe Barb was better off, as Barb’s best friend, Lillith, stated.

The most useful response, however, came from Barb’s greatest enemy since childhood, Phoebe. “You know,” Phoebe said, “If you knock him off before he files for anything, you get it all.”

So, much to Barb’s surprise, she found herself plotting with Phoebe. It was like first grade all over again.

©2023 Chel Owens

Photo by Vitaly Gorbachev on Pexels.com

Written in response to Charli’s prompt at Carrot Ranch:

May 9, 2023, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about two who can keep a secret. Is the secret between them or is one keeping a secret from the other. Who are they? What remains unknown? What is revealed? Go where the prompt leads!

Atheist to Theist: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love God

(Continued, from last week)

I was an atheist.

As such, and as I mentioned before; several matters of anxiety, guilt, and disjoint were better for me. -Religiously speaking. I didn’t believe in God anymore. I wasn’t deluded, guilt-ridden, tied-down, or beholden to any sort of religious nonsense anymore.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Still, I continued to attend Sunday meetings at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I had children to raise. (And, if the query comes to anyone’s mind, I believe children need a foundation of religious structure in their youth. They are welcome to deviate from that upon reaching adulthood if that be their choice.)

So, I went. I lived among Believers and listened to their strange observations and conclusions. -Like, a woman’s reassuring me that my unborn child would be a missionary in heaven if he died before birth.

Strange, yes; but I wasn’t full-certain the club of atheism was The Answer to life, the universe, and everything, either.

Atheists were an easier group for me to relate to. I loved the smug surety of intelligence, the self-confidence, the witty ridicule, and the assumption of deep thoughts and deep discussions.

While Christians drawled that, “Jesus saves,” Atheists succinctly posited, “If I were to suggest that between the Earth and Mars there is a china teapot revolving about the sun in an elliptical orbit, nobody would be able to disprove my assertion provided I were careful to add that the teapot is too small to be revealed even by our most powerful telescopes” (Bertrand Russell).

But atheists lacked the ability to answer my specific questions like Why do I exist as a sentient being but my ultimate purpose is to return to dust? and What about those times I know God stepped into my life, or in others’ lives whom I trusted? I experienced a similar phenomenon of general doubts or uncertainties I’d had with theism. Like mosquitoes, the concerns persisted and would not be exterminated. All wasn’t sunshine and roses, even with my accepting that sun and rose existed without fairies amongst them.

I sought answers and discovered inadequacies.

Photo by Keira Burton

What was I to do?

Time passed, without resolve.

Then, without God in my life, He stepped in.

I received personal revelation. I distinctly felt that I needed to sign up for an educational-pursuit program the LDS Church operates. At the time, I knew very little about it. I don’t recall my seeking inspiration on the matter nor my asking for direction of this kind. If pressed, I believe someone mentioned its existence and I just knew I was to sign up.

The program is designed to prepare adults for advanced education; it’s a weekly class on life skills, writing and mathematics, and -most unbeknownst to me- religious topics.

As an atheist and a seeker of logical truth, I was pursuing non-religious literature for a presumed ‘balance;’ from that, I went to studying and taking notes on scriptural texts and lectures by LDS leaders.

My attending Pathway was the first step in a long, long hike back up the figurative Mt. Sinai; one I was not keen to take even with my burning desire to know things for certain.

I’d love to leave everyone hanging with the overused, “The rest, as they say, is history.”

How trite and incomplete; particularly if you, like me, seek real answers and actual truth.

But, I feel the time is getting long. And so, instead, I’ll drop a cliché to be continued. Adieu, adieu, parting is such sweet sorrow. Farewell till next week.

©2023 Chel Owens