Into Light

The townsfolk knew she lived there; maybe. Sometimes Mrs. Beardy, nine miles North, said she’d seen someone hanging wash. Old Frank, the property South, couldn’t say the same -he didn’t pass Monty McCrae’s place for no reason, he’d said.

Or would’ve said. Maybe.

Old Frank wasn’t into talking, especially about others’ business. Everyone felt that way: leave someone alone if he wanted.

That’s why no one, not even Angelique (formerly Mrs. Monty) McCrae, recognized the lady in red who finally left a life of shadows, walked down the dirt path to a hired car, and rode away to freedom.

©2023 Chel Owens

Photo by Ekaterina Astakhova on Pexels.com

Written in response to Carrot Ranch‘s prompt:

January 16, 2023, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about a lady shadow. Who is this person and why do they lurk in the shadows. What is the tone and setting for your story? Go where the prompt leads!

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I abstain from eating two consecutive meals on a special Sunday once a month. This is referred to as Fast Sunday. I donate the money I would have used for the meals to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as a fast offering.

Fast Sunday is almost always the first Sunday of the month. Everyone, churchwide, observes Fast Sunday. Each person begins his or her fast with a prayer toward a goal, person, blessing, etc. s/he would like assistance with. At the end, when s/he breaks the fast, s/he ends with a prayer as well.

Some wards and branches send their priesthood-bearing youth to visit each home and collect the fast offerings from LDS members of that ward or branch. A member fills out a special slip of paper and includes a check with whatever amount s/he thinks is appropriate. Members may also pay by direct deposit.

What is the money used for?

Members can give fast offerings to one of the bishopric or branch presidency members. The bishop or branch president uses the money to help those in need in his ward or branch.
Fast offerings may be used to help feed the hungry.
Fast offerings might be used to care for the sick.
In each way a fast offering is used, it helps take care of Heavenly Father’s children.

Liahona Magazine, June 2005, “What Are Fast Offerings?

When members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints attend their church Sacrament Meeting on Fast Sunday, the format is that of an open mic testimony-bearing session. Anyone may come to the front and express his or her feelings, as prompted by the Holy Ghost to do so.

Fasting is a commandment from God but is also a powerful aid. A member may choose to fast besides his or her official Fast Sunday. It is to be used in conjunction with prayer. It is to be used for a special purpose; wards, families, individuals, and the entire LDS Church will call a special fast when heavenly guidance or aid is needed.

©2023 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

Yay! It’s Resolution Time!

What’s a new year without us all jumping on The Trend Bandwagon? If we do that and make resolutions, we’re in good shape already!

Or, not. New Year’s Resolutions seem increasingly unpopular. Perhaps we need a new approach…

Last new year (January of 2022), my blogging friend wrote that she was stating a WORD for the year. She had one for the previous year, and one for the upcoming year. Following suit, I chose complete for 2021 and control for 2022.

I wasn’t aiming to take over a bank. I didn’t wish to subvert my children’s free will. This control had to do with self-management and speaking up for my needs. I revisited my word in September; I’d completed some unstated goals. Reflecting again, at this point, I see I’ve become better at advocating for me.

Photo by Image Hunter on Pexels.com

But, what about 2023?

I need a word synonymous with resolution that doesn’t bring new year and failed diet to mind. -Because, I want this year to be one of finishing what has long been in process. I want the house project complete, our family size decided, a book made, balance restored, and to determine the ultimate fate of things like this blog. I want loose ends tied. In story terms, I seek conflict resolution…

Which, it turns out, has a term: dénouement.

Google translate suggests it means outcome. I find this funny, considering that dénoue means unravels. Perhaps we must come apart to bring things back together. Either way, I’m fond of the third definition dictionary.com suggests for dénouement: the outcome or resolution of a doubtful series of occurrences.

Isn’t that life?

….

Now, what about you? Do you have a word for last year? How about for this one?

—–

Here’s everything I’ve written this year. Phew!:
Sunday, January 1: Shared a quote by Carol Siegler.

Friday, January 6: Friday Photo! Looks temperate out there.

Saturday, January 7: There’s a new Terrible Poetry Contest for this month!! Write a prime poem about climate change. Do it today!

Sunday, January 8: This ‘un’s a quote by someone, like Abraham Lincoln.

Monday, January 9: Mormon Monday: Marriage. It’s what brings us together, today.

Tuesday, January 10: “Hullo, Rabbit!” in response to Carrot Ranch‘s prompt.

Wednesday, January 11: This post.

©2023 Chel Owens

Hullo, Rabbit!

Skyford sniffed and stood, his haunches holding his readied weight. It was a powerful thing, to be a rabbit: one could spring away, avoid detection, or squeeze beneath a barbed fence.

He barely twitched when Neumann padded to his side. A whisker moved as Suphia straightened near his foot. Skyford cocked his enviable ears, hearing rabbit after rabbit join their ranks amidst the cabbage patch.

So many men had teased with the expression, “Breed like rabbits.” Skyford’s face hardened into a leer. Today, man would change his aphorisms. Today, man would realize what purpose rabbits had been breeding for.

©2023 Chel Owens

Photo by lil artsy on Pexels.com

Written in response to Carrot Ranch‘s prompt:

January 9, 2023, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story that includes rabbits. Is it a family? A strange planet? Some crazy bunny person’s pets? Who are they and what are they doing? Go where the prompt leads!

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I have been sealed to my husband for time and all eternity in a holy temple. We’ve promised to stay faithful to each other, forever.

Members of the Church [of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints] believe that marriages performed in temples are “sealed,” or blessed to last for eternity. The concept that the family unit can continue beyond the grave as a conscious, loving entity, with the marriage partnership and parent-child relationships intact, is a core belief of members of [the Church].

LDS Newsroom

An eternal marriage, sealed in the temple, is one of the essential ordinances a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints makes -after baptism and receiving one’s personal temple endowments.

This sacred covenant is only between a man and a woman who are worthy. The ceremony is performed by a man who holds the proper priesthood authority. Children born to a couple sealed in the temple are also sealed to that couple, forever.

The sealing ordinance may also be completed after a civil marriage, or even after a person (and that person’s spouse) has died (see Temple Ordinances for the Deceased).

Those who choose not to be married or cannot find someone to make this covenant with are still welcome within the LDS Church and encouraged to do all they can toward that and the other ordinances, and to support and serve the other members as much as all the other members do.

©2023 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.

-The Internet, although often attributed to Benjamin Franklin or Confucius.
Quote Investigator is fairly certain original credit goes to Xunzi (Xun Kuang), a Confucian philosopher who lived in the third century B.C.E., with the quote:

“Not having heard of it is not as good as having heard of it. Having heard of it is not as good as having seen it. Having seen it is not as good as knowing it. Knowing it is not as good as putting it into practice. Learning arrives at putting it into practice and then stops . . .

-Xunzi, Xunzi: The Complete Text, chapter 8: “The Achievements of the Ru” (translated by Eric L. Hutton, Princeton University Press, 2014.)

The Terrible Poetry Contest 1/7/2023

Hello to the new year, and to a new Terrible Poetry Contest!

Terrible poetry isn’t that difficult; hand an iambic pentameter to an eight-year-old and it’s done! Or… read here for a little more assistance.

Ready? Let’s get rolling with this month’s prompt. Excepting Obbverse’s excellent Christmas win, Geoff of TanGental won the last time round. He’s declared:

  1. Theme and Form
    The theme is climate change.
    The form is a syllabic poem in praise of Prime Numbers: 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 11,13, etc. This means your first line with have one syllable; the second will have two; the third, three; the fourth, five; etc.
  2. Length
    I’m not sure how long you can keep priming your numbers, so that sounds like the length is up to your tenacity.
  3. Rhyme?
    Up to you!
  4. Terrible!
    Scientists predict an unusual rise in terribleness, followed by scattered storms of painful prose.
  5. Rating
    Is the perfect storm that risqué? I’m sure Geoff’s good with wherever the wind takes you on this one.

You have till 8:00 a.m. MST on Thursday, January 26 to submit a poem.

Use the form below if you want to be anonymous until I post the results. The form hasn’t saved what you submitted unless you see a message saying it has.

Or, for a more social experience, include your poem or a link to it in the comments. Please alert me if your pingback or poem does not show up within a day.

The winner gains bragging rights, a badge, and the pick of next contest’s theme and form.

—–

©2023 Chel Owens

Photo by Markus Spiske on Pexels.com