That’s a Moray

I found this oldie-but-goodie online. If the one source I found is correct, we’re not sure who penned this parody:

When the moon hits your eye,
Like a big pizza pie,
That’s amore.

When an eel bites your hand,
And that’s not what you planned,
That’s a moray.

When our habits are strange,
And our customs deranged,
That’s our mores.

When your horse chews dried grass,
And then begs for more, alas,
That’s some more hay.

When your sheep go to graze,
In a damp marshy place,
That’s a moor, eh?

When your boat comes home fine,
And you tie up her line,
That’s a moor, eh?

When Othello’s poor wife,
Becomes stabbed with a knife,
That’s a Moor, eh?

When you ace your last tests,
Like you did all the rest,
That’s some more A’s!

When on Mt. Cook you see,
A long aborigine,
That’s a Maori.

When your chocolate graham
Is so full and so crammed,
That s’more, eh?

http://homepage.ntu.edu.tw/~karchung/intro%20page%2024b.htm

Photo by Jonathan lajoie on Pexels.com

Sunday Fun – Announcing The Guidelines For The 7th Annual Valentiny Writing Contest!!! — Susanna Leonard Hill

Well, hi there, everyone! In spite of my tendency to forget what day it is, I do know that today is Sunday. Not a posting day for me. But let’s face it. It’s freezing cold, there’s snow everywhere, and going outdoors is likely to cause loss of digits or possibly your nose to frostbite. Not […]

Sunday Fun – Announcing The Guidelines For The 7th Annual Valentiny Writing Contest!!! — Susanna Leonard Hill

5 Signs You’re A Writer

I found these scarily true. Let’s see if you can relate:

Wordland

If you’re new to writing you might be thinking “hm, how do I know when I’m actually a writer?” I mean yes there’s the whole writing stuff malarky but there are also some other tell-tale signs you’re a writer that you should be on the lookout for.

1) Your search history is… interesting

Also potentially incriminating, but everything you Google is for writing purposes only. Unfortunately looking for details about how to treat a stab wound, or where Uranium is stored could put you on the radar of a national security agency or your local law enforcement. There’s also the ever-present danger of falling down a Wiki hole.

2) You have many, many notebooks

Even though you have ample digital devices in which to write and make notes, you still have many notebooks. There’s one by your bed, on your desk, in the loo – everywhere inspiration may strike. And…

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Grandpa’s Tool Shed #flashfiction — Norah Colvin

My good friend, Norah, shared this sweet short fiction piece:

This week at the Carrot Ranch, Charli Mills challenged writers to In 99 words (no more, no less), write about tools. Whose tools are they and how do they fit into the story? What kind of tools? Go where the prompt leads! Charli, of course wrote about writer’s tools and provided a multitude of links […]

Grandpa’s Tool Shed #flashfiction — Norah Colvin

Import Important, by JulesPaige

Import Important
(99 syllables, Double Ennead Ekphrastic Acrostic
of the split words of Import Important)

I employ the rake to
manage the fall leaves
piling them high at the curb for picking up
or some are for my trees
raked round their bases

tender protection for
inclement weather
might damage the roots that are near the surface
perhaps when snow piles high
over the back yard…

rest well with slow sap, my
trees that shed their leaves
and know that I look for budding health come spring
now though brace for winter;
time for dreamings’ nigh

***

If I too could sleep the winter through,
could I would I sleep thusly
under warm leaf quilts

©2021 JulesPaige

Jules is a poetmaster, weaving words expertly whenever she wishes.

Rebooted TV Series are just like cheating husbands: a TV Review – Dexter: Next Blood (2021) – Season 1, Episode 1 — Bookshelf Battle

I’ve been a fan of Bookshelf Battler’s reviews for years. He’s hilarious and often says exactly why I didn’t like a film or show but couldn’t figure out why…

He’s baaaack. BQB here with a review of the sequel series about America’s favorite serial killer with a code. I’ve often said being a fan of a cable TV show is a lot like being the long suffering wife of a husband going through a bad mid-life crisis. There we stand at the doorway in […]

TV Review – Dexter: Next Blood (2021) – Season 1, Episode 1 — Bookshelf Battle

The Things I Miss–, by Heather Dawn

As usual, the very intelligent and good person, Heather Dawn, captures the thoughts and feelings I just can’t…

I don’t write a lot these days, because I feel like my heart is grieving. It’s hard to share grief sometimes. I’m letting go of more and more things that I love, and today, I’m deeply missing these things: I miss writing on my blog. The past few months have been a whirlwind of babysitting, […]

The Things I Miss —

Halloweensie!!

I have yet to even be a finalist in this contest (I’m just that good), but Susanna Leonard Hill is hosting her famous Halloween writing competition for a children’s story NOW. You have till October 31st at midnight to submit a story according to her specifications ON HER SITE:

THE CONTEST: write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (children here defined as 12 and under) (title not included in word count) using the words glow-in-the-darkgoosebumps, and goodies.

  • Your story can be poetry or prose, scary, funny, sweet, or anything in between, but it will only count for the contest if it includes those 3 words and is 100 words. Get it? Halloweensie – because it’s not very long and it’s for little people 
  • You can go under the word count but not over!
  • Title is not included in the word count.
  • Also, being super clear for this year, glow-in-the-dark counts as 1 word (even though it looks like 4 )
  • You may use the words in any form i.e. glowed-in-the-dark, goosebumpley, goody (“Oh, goody!”, goody-two-shoes etc.), whathaveyou 
  • You are welcome to enter more than one entry – just remember you’ll be competing against yourself 
  • No illustration notes please!

And yes, I know 100 words is short, but that’s part of the fun and the challenge! We got just shy of 300 fantastic entries last year, so I know you can do it!

POST: your story in the comment section [on her site] between right now this very second and Sunday October 31st at Midnight – the witching hour! Please include your title, word count, and byline with your entry so that if your posting handle is MomNeedsAVacation I’ll still be able to tell who wrote your entry 

  • For those of you who would also like to post on your blogs, please feel free to do so! You are welcome to include the link to your blog with your entry in the comment section…so that people can come visit your blog, but all entries must be posted in the comment section of [Susanna’s Post] between now and Sunday October 31st at Midnight.
  • If you have difficulty posting your entry to the comments, which unfortunately sometimes happens, you may e-mail your entry to [Susanna] and I’ll post it for you! Contact button or [susanna[at]susannahill[dot]com Please place your entry in the body of the e-mail including your title and byline at the top – NO ATTACHMENTS! They will not be opened.
  • I know how hard you all work on your entries, and how anxious you are to get them posted, but please try to be a little patient if your entry doesn’t show up immediately. Many comments have to be manually approved, and it sometimes takes me a little while to post entries that come in by email. I promise I will get to everything as soon as I can. I try never to leave my desk during contests, but sometimes it’s unavoidable 
  • Side Note: WordPress will not properly format entries written in the shape of a pumpkin (or anything else!) or with fancy or colored fonts or unusual spacing. No matter how great it looks in whatever program you compose it in, be forewarned that when you post it in the comment section it is going to be basic and I am not able to change that for you, I’m afraid.

THE JUDGING: in a grueling marathon over the days following the contest close, my devoted assistants and I will read and re-read and narrow down the entries to a finalist field of about 12 which will be posted here for you to vote on I hope by Friday November 5th (though if the judging takes longer than expected it might be a little later – we will do our best!) The winner will be announced Monday November 8th (good lord willin’ and the creek don’t rise )

Judging criteria will be as follows:

  • 1. Kid-appeal! – These stories are intended for a young audience (ages 12 and under), so we’re looking for stories that children will enjoy and relate to.
  • 2.  Halloweeniness – the rules state a Halloween story, so it must be crystal clear that the story is about Halloween, not just some random spooky night.
  • 3. Use of all 3 required words and whether you came it at 100 words or less.
  • 4. Quality of story – entries must tell a story, including a main character of some kind and a true story arc even if it’s tiny   Entries must not be merely descriptions or mood pieces.
  • 5. Quality of Writing: check your spelling, grammar, punctuation etc.  If you’re going to rhyme, give us your best   Use and flow of language, correctness of mechanics, excellence of rhyme and meter if you use it, PROOFREADING!
  • 6. Originality and creativity – because that is often what sets one story above another.
  • 7. How well you followed the Submission Guidelines – agents and editors expect professionalism. This is a chance to practice making sure you read and follow specified guidelines. If you don’t follow agent and editor submission guidelines, they won’t even read your submission.

THE PRIZES: So amazing!……keep reading

The Running Shoes That Could

I’ve often wanted to capture what running means to me; how it can parallel to life and goals. Lisa does just that, perfectly, in her post:

The Manitoba Mom Blog

I found my New Balance shoes at a used clothing giveaway at church. In all my favorite colors, they caught my eye. They were nearly new – only a few pebbles in the treads, and a little tear in the mesh of the toe. On the inner soles they read, “Running”. An ambitious claim, I thought, if I were to be the one to take them. I had gotten into a routine of walking regularly, but the pain in my knees had prevented me from running very much, if at all. I used to jog in my teens and early twenties. But there had been two babies, about 25 pounds of weight gain, and over a decade of aging since then. Not to mention, arthritis runs in my family. Three out of four of my immediate family members have had joint replacements.

As I examined the shoes, however, I noticed…

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