I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I abstain from eating two consecutive meals on a special Sunday once a month. This is referred to as Fast Sunday. I donate the money I would have used for the meals to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as a fast offering.

Fast Sunday is almost always the first Sunday of the month. Everyone, churchwide, observes Fast Sunday. Each person begins his or her fast with a prayer toward a goal, person, blessing, etc. s/he would like assistance with. At the end, when s/he breaks the fast, s/he ends with a prayer as well.

Some wards and branches send their priesthood-bearing youth to visit each home and collect the fast offerings from LDS members of that ward or branch. A member fills out a special slip of paper and includes a check with whatever amount s/he thinks is appropriate. Members may also pay by direct deposit.

What is the money used for?

Members can give fast offerings to one of the bishopric or branch presidency members. The bishop or branch president uses the money to help those in need in his ward or branch.
Fast offerings may be used to help feed the hungry.
Fast offerings might be used to care for the sick.
In each way a fast offering is used, it helps take care of Heavenly Father’s children.

Liahona Magazine, June 2005, “What Are Fast Offerings?

When members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints attend their church Sacrament Meeting on Fast Sunday, the format is that of an open mic testimony-bearing session. Anyone may come to the front and express his or her feelings, as prompted by the Holy Ghost to do so.

Fasting is a commandment from God but is also a powerful aid. A member may choose to fast besides his or her official Fast Sunday. It is to be used in conjunction with prayer. It is to be used for a special purpose; wards, families, individuals, and the entire LDS Church will call a special fast when heavenly guidance or aid is needed.

©2023 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I have been sealed to my husband for time and all eternity in a holy temple. We’ve promised to stay faithful to each other, forever.

Members of the Church [of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints] believe that marriages performed in temples are “sealed,” or blessed to last for eternity. The concept that the family unit can continue beyond the grave as a conscious, loving entity, with the marriage partnership and parent-child relationships intact, is a core belief of members of [the Church].

LDS Newsroom

An eternal marriage, sealed in the temple, is one of the essential ordinances a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints makes -after baptism and receiving one’s personal temple endowments.

This sacred covenant is only between a man and a woman who are worthy. The ceremony is performed by a man who holds the proper priesthood authority. Children born to a couple sealed in the temple are also sealed to that couple, forever.

The sealing ordinance may also be completed after a civil marriage, or even after a person (and that person’s spouse) has died (see Temple Ordinances for the Deceased).

Those who choose not to be married or cannot find someone to make this covenant with are still welcome within the LDS Church and encouraged to do all they can toward that and the other ordinances, and to support and serve the other members as much as all the other members do.

©2023 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I believe that Joseph Smith saw our Heavenly Father; His son, Jesus Christ; and ancient prophets. I believe Joseph Smith received direct revelation, translated another testament of Jesus Christ (the Book of Mormon), and restored Heavenly Father’s church as it was (including returning keys of the Priesthood).

Joseph Smith Jr. was born December 23, 1805, in Sharon, Windsor County, Vermont. During his early life, he moved with his family to present-day Manchester, in western New York. It was while he was living there in the spring of 1820, when he was fourteen years of age, that he experienced his first vision, in which he was visited in person by God, the Eternal Father, and His Son Jesus Christ. He was told in this vision that the true Church of Jesus Christ that had been established in New Testament times, and which had administered the fulness of the gospel, was no longer on the earth. Other divine manifestations followed in which he was taught by many angels; it was shown to him that God had a special work for him to do on the earth and that through him the Church of Jesus Christ would be restored to the earth.

Doctrine and Covenants, Introduction

Joseph Smith spent his life translating the Book of Mormon, organizing the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, leading members, sharing revelations, assigning missionaries, building settlements, working on temples, managing funds, caring for a family, and spending a fair amount of time in trials and in prisons.

As to his initial, amazing vision: Smith recorded the event, himself, in a section known as Joseph Smith History, in a book of scripture called the Pearl of Great Price.

Owing to the many reports which have been put in circulation by evil-disposed and designing persons, in relation to the rise and progress of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, all of which have been designed by the authors thereof to militate against its character as a Church and its progress in the world—I have been induced to write this history, to disabuse the public mind, and put all inquirers after truth in possession of the facts, as they have transpired, in relation both to myself and the Church, so far as I have such facts in my possession.

Joseph Smith History, Chapter 1, Verse 1

His other revelations, commandments, and some personal history are found in various records -most of which are contained in the Doctrine and Covenants.

The Doctrine and Covenants is a collection of divine revelations and inspired declarations given for the establishment and regulation of the kingdom of God on the earth in the last days. Although most of the sections are directed to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the messages, warnings, and exhortations are for the benefit of all mankind and contain an invitation to all people everywhere to hear the voice of the Lord Jesus Christ, speaking to them for their temporal well-being and their everlasting salvation.
Most of the revelations in this compilation were received through Joseph Smith Jr., the first prophet and president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Others were issued through some of his successors in the Presidency (see headings to D&C 135136, and 138, and Official Declarations 1 and 2).

Doctrine and Covenants, Introduction

Joseph Smith died as a martyr at the age of 38. An armed mob stormed Carthage Jail, where he and a few other faithful members were being held, and shot and killed him.

©2022 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I hold a temple recommend and attend the temple when I can.

Medford Oregon Temple ©LDS Media Library

A member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints attends an LDS Meetinghouse (or equivalent) every Sunday for regular services, like taking the Sacrament; and for social events outside of religious services. Anyone may attend services at these buildings,* even those who are not members. Temples, on the other hand, are special. They are sacred.

Temples have a more specific purpose. They are places specially set apart for sacred service and ceremonies. They are designated by the Lord and dedicated to His purposes. Temples are the only places where some priesthood ordinances are authorized to be performed. These sacred ceremonies lift and inspire participants as they make commitments to follow the teachings and example of Jesus Christ.

Churchofjesuschrist.org, “Why Latter-day Saints Build Temples

The work done in the temple is for eternal purposes: receiving one’s endowment, sealing a couple and/or their family together forever, baptizing oneself on behalf of those who died before being able to be baptized (and receive the Holy Ghost), and performing an endowment or sealing for those who are no longer living and did not have that chance in life.

This work is necessary for our progression in life and in life after death.

The ordinances and covenants of the temple are not merely important to our exaltation—they are essential. President [Boyd K.] Packer …explained, “Ordinances and covenants become our credentials for admission into [God’s] presence. To worthily receive them is the quest of a lifetime; to keep them thereafter is the challenge of mortality” (Boyd K. Packer, “Covenants,” Ensign, May 1987). Faithfully obeying covenants made with God is the most important goal we can pursue in this life. In the words of President Russell M. Nelson, “The greatest compliment that can be earned here in this life is to be known as a covenant keeper. The rewards for a covenant keeper will be realized both here and hereafter” (Russell M. Nelson, “Covenants,” Ensign, Nov. 2011).

Churchofjesuschrist.org, “Why Ordinances and Covenants Matter

Because these sacred practices come after initial steps like baptism, a faithful member may only attend an LDS temple after receiving a temple recommend: a pass signed by that member’s bishop or counselor, then that member’s stake president or stake counselor. Those men only sign the recommend if the member answers specific questions in a satisfactory manner:

  1. Do you have faith in and a testimony of God, the Eternal Father; His Son, Jesus Christ; and the Holy Ghost?
  2. Do you have a testimony of the Atonement of Jesus Christ and of His role as your Savior and Redeemer?
  3. Do you have a testimony of the Restoration of the gospel of Jesus Christ?
  4. Do you sustain the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as the prophet, seer, and revelator and as the only person on the earth authorized to exercise all priesthood keys? Do you sustain the members of the First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles as prophets, seers, and revelators? Do you sustain the other General Authorities and local leaders of the Church?
  5. The Lord has said that all things are to be “done in cleanliness” before Him (Doctrine and Covenants 42:41). Do you strive for moral cleanliness in your thoughts and behavior? Do you obey the law of chastity?
  6. Do you follow the teachings of the Church of Jesus Christ in your private and public behavior with members of your family and others?
  7. Do you support or promote any teachings, practices, or doctrine contrary to those of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints?
  8. Do you strive to keep the Sabbath day holy, both at home and at church; attend your meetings; prepare for and worthily partake of the sacrament; and live your life in harmony with the laws and commandments of the gospel?
  9. Do you strive to be honest in all that you do?
  10. Are you a full-tithe payer?
  11. Do you understand and obey the Word of Wisdom?
  12. Do you have any financial or other obligations to a former spouse or to children? If yes, are you current in meeting those obligations?
  13. Do you keep the covenants that you made in the temple, including wearing the temple garment as instructed in the endowment?
  14. Are there serious sins in your life that need to be resolved with priesthood authorities as part of your repentance?
  15. Do you consider yourself worthy to enter the Lord’s house and participate in temple ordinances?

    Ensign Magazine, “Church Updates Temple Recommend Interview Questions,” January, 2020

Besides attending the temple for completing sacred ordinances, a member may go for a break from the world and to receive personal revelation.

Manti Utah Temple, ©LDS Media Library

As of initially posting this, “The Church of Jesus Christ currently has 168 operating temples and another 68 announced, 41 under construction and five undergoing renovation” (LDS Newsroom, “The Church of Jesus Christ Will Build 18 New Houses of the Lord“). They span from Utah to Ukraine to Australia to Argentina.

©2022 Chel Owens

*so long as the person isn’t breaking local laws on noxious or inappropriate behavior.

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I have a calling: a volunteer position that helps others, usually in my local Latter-day Saint ward and neighborhood.

A calling is a service opportunity and a way to run the LDS church organization.

Heavenly Father gave Jesus Christ a sacred mission to fulfill (see Luke 4:18–19John 6:383 Nephi 27:14–16). During His ministry, the Savior trusted His disciples with important responsibilities (see Luke 10:1–9). Likewise, the Lord calls men and women to serve in the Church today through inspired invitations from His servants. These opportunities to serve are known as callings.

LDS General Handbook, “Callings in the Church.”

Every member of the LDS Church may be asked to serve in one of the various positions needed to teach, organize, plan, or manage other members. These positions range from teachers of young children (Primary Teacher) to organizer of meetinghouse scheduling outside of Sunday worship (Building Coordinator) to the leader of a ward (Bishop) or even leader of the entire LDS Church (President).

Most are called to serve in their local wards or branches. Within that, the most common position is that of a teacher. Whether an apostle or a teacher, the process is about the same. If you are a member of the LDS Church and receive a calling: a member of the bishopric (or stake, or area, or overall organization) asks to meet with you and your spouse, the bishop or counsel extends the offer to serve and gives you a few details, you consult with yourself and God, and you tell the bishop or counselor yea or nay.

An important side note I missed upon first publishing is that the member’s calling is announced to the appropriate meeting of other members (local, stake, church-wide) with a request to sustain the proposed person to the proposed position. If any are opposed, they are welcome to say so. Sustaining and opposing are indicated by raising our right hand. If someone is opposed, the opposition is noted and said person talks to the appropriate leader in private.

A local ward or branch is split into four main groups: Elder’s Quorum for the men, Relief Society for the women, Young Men’s/Young Women’s for the teenagers, and Primary for the children. Most callings, as I said, are to teach primary-aged children and the youth. There are teachers in the other groups as well. After that, pretty much any job necessary in the ward or branch is a calling.

And, until one reaches the general authorities-level, all callings are unpaid, volunteer positions.

A member decides whether s/he can perform the duties of the calling as offered. Members are also discouraged from vying for certain positions. Furthermore, we LDS understand that God wants us to serve, asks us to serve, and will help us to serve.

©2022 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I pay tithing.

The Bible indicates that God’s people followed the law of tithing anciently; through modern prophets, God restored this law once again to bless His children. To fulfill this commandment, Church members give one-tenth of their income to the Lord through His Church. These funds are used to build up the Church and further the work of the Lord throughout the world.

One of the blessings of membership in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the privilege of paying tithing. This privilege is a double blessing. By paying tithing, Church members show their gratitude to God for their blessings and their resolve to trust in the Lord rather than in material things. They also help further the work of the Lord in the earth, blessing others of God’s children with the opportunity to learn of Him and grow in the gospel.

LDS Gospel Topics, “Tithing

Tithing toward the LDS Church is understood to be 10% of one’s income; often termed increase. This amount is given to a member of one’s bishopric who then processes it through the executive secretary. The funds are ultimately processed at LDS Church headquarters and its usage is determined by a “council… comprised of the First Presidency, the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, and the Presiding Bishopric” (“Tithing“).

Tithing funds are always used for the Lord’s purposes—to build and maintain temples and meetinghouses, to sustain missionary work, to educate Church members, and to carry on the work of the Lord throughout the world.

LDS Gospel Topics, “Tithing

In these modern times, tithing may also be paid with direct deposit.

Payment of a full tithe is one requirement members must meet in order to be considered for a temple recommend -meaning, the ability to attend one of the sacred temples of the LDS church. Temples are different than meetinghouses and have specific, eternal ordinances performed therein.

Besides discussing tithing at a temple recommend interview; every year, families meet with their bishop for Tithing Declaration. Recent news release terms this as “primarily a learning experience — especially for children and youth — and an opportunity for Latter-day Saints to declare their tithing faithfulness” (LDS Newsroom).

©LDS Media Library

Some members take the 10% of one’s increase rule very seriously and donate from the gross amount earned from a paycheck. Most seem to opt for 10% of what’s deposited after taxes. Those without specific income may choose service activities, or supporting youth or ward activities as needed (in the past, early LDS Church members would literally give their bishop part of a herd of cattle or measure of flour, etc.). Tithing is between you, the Lord, and your bishop.

©LDS Media Library

©2022 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I am a missionary.

I’ve promised to share my testimony and the teachings of the LDS Church to the peoples of this world*.

If I were to couch in definite terms two of the most potent convictions in the hearts of the Latter-day Saints, I would name: First, an abiding assurance that the gospel, as taught by the Redeemer when he lived among men and which was later modified, changed and corrupted by men, has been restored by the Redeemer in its purity and fulness; and second, following naturally the first, a conviction in the heart of every member of this Church that the responsibility rests upon the membership of the Church to preach the restored gospel to every nation, kindred, tongue and people.

David O. McKay, In Conference Report, Apr. 1927, 102

This is different than what most think of with the phrase ‘Mormon missionary.’ In terms of an official calling to serve, there are four specific opportunities:

First is the classic missionary who knocks on doors and hands out copies of The Book of Mormon. Single, unmarried young men or single, unmarried young women may devote a specific period of their young lives to serving and teaching. For young men, they may apply for a mission at age 18 and serve for two years; for young women, they may apply for a mission at age 19 and serve for 18 months. This is different than the standard was for years, when men were 19 and women 21.

Serving a mission in that fashion is a commitment to the work -where the young people are called to a specific area; live and work with a companion of the same sex at all times; and follow rules and regimens regarding dress, behavior, daily schedule, service, contact with family back home (though this has also improved), and what sort of media they view or listen to.

Second, a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints may be called as a mission president while he is married with a family at home. His entire family travels to the mission site with him and supports him and lives their regular lives for the duration of the three-year calling.

Mission presidents share a variety of responsibilities in their service. They are directed to first maintain their own well-being and that of their families. They instruct missionaries to effectively teach gospel principles as well as to maintain their individual health. In addition, the president assumes responsibility for the baptism of new converts and their initial development as new members of the Church.

LDS Newsroom, “Mission President

Third is older adults who wish to apply for and be called to a senior mission:

You may be recommended to serve as a missionary beginning at the age of 40 if you have no dependent children under the age of 18 living in your home. There is not an upper age limit for senior missionary service as long as you are physically able to meet the needs of the assignment.

Senior Missionary Service

Senior missionaries are usually a retired couple, and they can do the same sort of tasks as the young ones everyone is familiar with. Usually, however, they keep to less strenuous tasks like office work, visits, and training.

Fourth is serving in the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square (formerly known as the Mormon Tabernacle Choir), or in places like the LDS Church museums. Also, within this and the other three categories, an interested person may be called to a service mission.

Missionaries in all these shapes and sizes and ages do not get paid for their service. Certain expenses are covered by mission funds; like subsidization so all missions for young adults cost a uniform amount, housing for the mission president, clothing for the choir members, etc.

©2022 Chel Owens

*Although I’ve promised to be a missionary, this doesn’t mean I’m attempting to convert any readers. My sole purpose in writing about the LDS Church is to inform, clarify confusion, and answer questions.

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I attend church each Sunday* as part of a ward; the wards (or branches) are grouped into stakes (or districts), then areas. There is a man called to preside over each level, leading up to the president of the entire Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (currently President Russell M. Nelson).

Like school boundaries, an LDS ward or branch (if there aren’t enough church-goers to form a full ward) is a geographical area drawn to include 150 to 500 members. That group is assigned a building and a time to meet each Sunday. A man is called to be the bishop; he, in turn, calls two counselors and a secretary. Those three men are known as the bishopric.

The bishop holds the priesthood keys to lead the work of the Church in the ward (see 3.4.1). He and his counselors form a bishopric. They receive guidance from the stake presidency. They care for ward members with love, helping them become true followers of Jesus Christ (see Moroni 7:48).

LDS General Handbook, “The Bishopric

The bishop is like a pastor, rabbi, or priest. None of the bishopric is paid, however, and each is usually married.

The bishoprics in a stake are presided over by a stake presidency, which also has a president and counselors. They are also not paid and are usually married.

Stake presidencies are presided over by an area president and counselors. Again, unpaid. Again, usually married.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has many, many councils, counselors, presiding members, general authorities, presidents of specific levels and groups, members of the Seventies, etc. above the local level of leadership. For an explanation, read the General Handbook on “Serving in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.” Above it all is the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. The head of the LDS Church and the Twelve is President Russell M. Nelson, the current president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Unlike the majority of callings in the LDS Church, those filling the positions in upper management levels do receive a monetary stipend. In 2000, the pay of one of the members of the Quorum of the Twelve was estimated at $89,325.05.

General Authorities, as these upper-level leaders are referred to, serve full-time as their only job. They often travel. They oversee operations all over the world.

General Authorities leave their careers when they are called into full time Church service. When they do so, they focus all of their time on serving the Church, and are given a living allowance. The living allowance is uniform for all General Authorities. None of the funds for this living allowance come from the tithing of Church members, but instead from proceeds of the Church’s financial investments.

Eric Hawkins, reported in “MormonLeaks web page posts documents about ‘living allowance’ of LDS general authorities

©2022 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I wear clothing that is modest. On Sunday, I wear a dressier outfit for attending church. I wear that same level of attire when attending the temple.

Our clothing expresses who we are. It sends messages about us, and it influences the way we and others act. When we are well groomed and modestly dressed, we can invite the companionship of the Spirit and exercise a good influence on those around us.

LDS Study Manual, “Modesty

I therefore wear clothing that covers my temple garments all the time, unless I’m swimming or exercising excessively -even then, quite prudishly, my workout clothes could cover garments.

I wear a dress or a skirt and blouse each Sunday. I’ll wear those clothes if I go to the temple, attend General Conference (more on that, later), or sit through LDS Church-sponsored meetings that ask for it. The LDS men wear dress slacks and a dress shirt at the least, although most go for a full suit and tie.

The youth (12ish-18ish) in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are given specific guidelines about dress:

Immodest clothing is any clothing that is tight, sheer, or revealing in any other manner. Young women should avoid short shorts and short skirts, shirts that do not cover the stomach, and clothing that does not cover the shoulders or is low-cut in the front or the back. Young men should also maintain modesty in their appearance. Young men and young women should be neat and clean and avoid being extreme or inappropriately casual in clothing, hairstyle, and behavior. They should choose appropriately modest apparel when participating in sports. The fashions of the world will change, but the Lord’s standards will not change.

LDS Study Manual, Standards for Youth, “Dress and Appearance

The LDS missionaries are also given an official dress standard -which, by the way, can be those bright young people knocking on your door, an older couple giving tours of LDS Church sites, or even members of the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square.

The missionary dress standards address grooming, modesty, appearance, and attitudes. There are rules for the men and rules for the women.

Those who are not youth or missionaries (the rest of the regular members of the LDS church) simply dress to be modest. The rest of our church dress getup (dresses, suits, ties) is mostly due to tradition and appearing respectable.

©2022 Chel Owens

……

We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.

I’m a Mormon, So…

I’m a Mormon, so I am NOT a polygamist.

Joesph F. Smith, a former President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and his family. ©pbs.org

Today, the practice of polygamy is strictly prohibited in the Church, as it has been for over a century. Polygamy — or more correctly polygyny, the marriage of more than one woman to the same man — was a part of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for a half-century. The practice began during the lifetime of Joseph Smith but became publicly and widely known during the time of Brigham Young.

LDS Newsroom

Joseph Smith received revelation regarding plural marriage in 1831. He instated the practice privately; only those given permission or commandment to marry two or more women did so. Brigham Young‘s rather public, sizeable family drew attention to this peculiar tenet.

Even at that time, most men participating in a plural marriage only had two wives (LDS Study Manual, “Plural Marriage and Families in Early Utah”). ‘Twas a unique practice, still, given that.

But, Latter-day Saints haven’t been polygamists for a really long time now.

In 1890, the Lord inspired Church President Wilford Woodruff to issue a statement that led to the end of the practice of plural marriage in the Church. In this statement, known as the Manifesto, President Woodruff declared his intention to abide by U.S. law forbidding plural marriage and to use his influence to convince members of the Church to do likewise.

LDS Study Manual

There are pockets of peoples still practicing plural marriage; none do so as members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since “any person who practices plural marriage cannot become or remain a member of the Church” (LDS Study Manual). They’re splinter groups who formed awhile ago.*

Pretty much what these groups dress and groom like. You see them around border towns and at Costcos now and then. ©Route-Fifty

©2022 Chel Owens

*If you’re looking to understand the polygamist way of life, I recommend reading Love Times Three, by (ish) Joe Darger, Alina Darger, Vicki Darger, Valerie Darger; but mostly Brooke Adams who edited everyone’s words.

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We Mormons are officially members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and are to drop any name but that. Since many recognize the nickname of ‘Mormon’ and it works with the alliteration so well, however, I will use the term.

My other note is that I will keep to official doctrinal practices. I will add my own application of them, especially in response to comments.

My final note is that I LOVE discussing anything I write. Don’t be rude, obviously, but any and all queries or responses are welcome.

My final note beyond the final note is that I do not seek to convert anyone. I am motivated by forming connections, answering curiosity, and straightening pictures. So, you’re safe.